Healthy Recipes

Skipping Out on Bacon and Booze Might Cut Cancer Risk

Fatty meats and brews can wreak havoc on your waistline and increase the risk of cancer.

Cutting beer and bacon consumption can reduce risk of cancer
Russell Hart / D. Sharon Pruitt Pink Sherbet Photography

There's some bad news for bacon and beer lovers. Indulging in the fried pork-and-brew duo can increase your risk of some cancers, according to new research from the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF). The organization revealed that the elimination of food and drink like beer and bacon can help cut your risk of cancer by up to 40 percent. 

The WCRF released a 10-point list after research found that 12 cancers, including liver, breast, kidney, ovary, esophagus, pancreas, and more were specifically linked to consumption of alcohol (beer, wine, spirits), processed meats (i.e. bacon), and other bad habits. The research was conducted using information compiled from more than 51 million people.

Overall, obesity is a top risk factor for cancer, so processed meat and beer are obviously a fatty duo. Fast food, sugar, starches, and other processed and fried foods are obvious culprits as well. Obesity may top smoking as the number one cause of cancer worldwide, according to the WCRF with new cancer cases expected to reach 24 million by 2035.

When it comes to sizzling bacon, you can opt for leaner turkey bacon but in moderation. Unfortunately, there's no substitute or alternative to beer, but drinking alcohol in moderation is always a smart move. 

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